Tag Archives: uu maine

Vigil for September 11th

Monday, September 11th

6:30 am – 8:00 am

The Vigil space will be hosted by: Rev. “Twinkle” Marie Manning. She will be joined by        Rev. Scott Jones and welcomes a multi-faith clergy presence, as well as active duty military and veterans. peace-workers.

At 7:00am a prayer will be offered, followed by local musician and songwriter Aaron McCannell singing his song, “Stand Tall,” which portrays the emotions of the tragic day as well as hope for the future.

This gathering is open to all who seek a place of spiritual sanctuary on this day of remembrance.

embrace life even in the face of darkness

Somedays you just need a little extra encouragement and turning towards someone who has followed his passion – and lost it, only to move towards a new calling even more passionately, is such a blessing.

Rev. David Ruffin’s story is inspirational.  From theatre stage to church pulpit, he has captured the hearts and minds of many.
This morning for all those experiencing loss and transition, and for those who face depression as a familiar part of their experience, I encourage you to read his words.

“I remember pouring over inspirational books. I found few answers, but I did find friends:

Parker Palmer assured me that feelings of depression were not only normal but a gift that ­could lead me deeper and help ‘let my life speak.’

Kahlil Gibran reframed my present pain as something that was carving space for future joy.

Mary Oliver proclaimed her gospel: ‘You do not have to be good.’

And Rainer Maria Rilke urged patience ‘with everything unresolved in (my) heart…​to love the questions themselves.’

Most importantly, I learned I had good company in struggling to find my way….

…..Still, was it my purpose?”

read Dave’s full essay, here:



LIBANA is coming to Maine!!

Saturday, March 11th, 2017


UUCB Concerts for a Cause: LIBANA

Unitarian Universalist Church of Brunswick

Brunswick, ME

Tickets on sale now:



In 1979, a group of women sharing a passion for international music, dance, and women’s issues formed the global music ensemble Libana. Inspired by Judy Chicago’s groundbreaking exhibit “The Dinner Party,” Libana took their name from a woman honored by the artist—a 10th century Moorish poet, philosopher, and musician—symbolizing women’s creativity, vision and spirit throughout time. 

LIBANA believes deeply in the power of song, the rhythm of the drum, and the spirit of dance to connect people across vast cultural difference. Creating a bridge of the heart, their commitment to the artistic expression of the global community has inspired dynamic cross-cultural understanding, profound healing, and widespread peacebuilding. 




An invitation to friends


An invitation for my friends.

This is the meditation room in my home.  I open this and my home up to friends when they need a quiet place to sit, gather their thoughts, connect with their hearts, either in solitude or in small group ritual.  

I often host gatherings in my home honoring my own Unitarian Universalist spiritual traditions and explore the mystery of living on this planet.  

I also welcome friends from various faiths and traditions to come lead workshops, retreats, meditations and concerts.

If you feel called to gather together for any of these, let me know and I am happy to host.

Or, if you desire to simply have a place to come, sit and reflect, I offer my home for that too. 


~ Twinkle

Multi-site Maine?

Our recent relocation to Maine has resulted in great blessings and great losses.

Our larger church communities are things of the past.

Not just for my son and I personally in our new home location, but for Maine as a whole.

For us it is a new loss.

For UU Mainers, it seems to have a long legacy leading to the present day “micro-small-church” ministries.

For instance, there is a beautiful church literally down the road from us. Less than a mile away.  We researched online at the UUA website before we came it is stated to have more than 30 active members.  But this is not true.  Not even close.  It is a ghost-church.  It is beautiful with its stained glass windows.  And its old sanctuary is indescribable in its beauty – rounded interior and ceiling murals.  But the beauty ends there.  Not because it is only skin deep, but because it is not being taken care of from the inside out, nor the outside in.

Partly because of church politics and inflexible heart-sets.

And, largely because  of “lack” and “other” mentality.

All are definitely Not welcome here, and those who come better be willing to do alot of work “their way” or else be quickly cast to the lot of those undesirable.

This unwelcoming atmosphere and unwillingness to change in transformational ways is evident by the lack of attendance – on Sunday mornings typically less than a dozen people.  Often no more than six people. As well as lack of programming or outreach.  The free listing in the paper each week has not changed in a decade – it touts that their is Religious Education and childcare available on Sundays.  This is not true – neither are offered. Children are not a focus at all in this congregation. Nor is enhancing the programming for adults seeking spiritual growth. Nor do they wish to consider re-envisioning Who They Are in their community, or in our Faith Tradition.

They have assets though. Assets handled mindfully could transform the congregation and be a boon to our UU faith in this area of small town Maine.

They have a modest endowment. A few hundred thousand dollars – which is modest, even small, compared to larger congregations, yet coveted by those without such – especially startup organization who would use the funds in such creative ways that service and outreach and  growth would be cornerstones.  Yet, this endowment goes towards keeping the building operational at the expense of the community.  They have a  huge old building that in better circumstances could be used to offset expenses with rental fees.  Yet due to not being maintained properly over the years it has reached the point of needing astronomical amounts of funds to fully repair, let alone sustain. There is no financial stewardship to speak of by members or attendees.

The sustenance of the building has been kept afloat by the endowment.

The sustenance of the people has been largely sacrificed due to prevailing personalities more focused on their stained glass windows than on the hearts and minds of those who would otherwise seek this church out as their spiritual home.

If the powers that be had a vision of how best to serve the community they are in, as opposed to how best to maintain the old building, they have the means to make a huge positive difference. Now, they need to gain the mindset and heartset to do so.

I will write more about this later.

Another sad discovery was that to the community in this small town it is the crazy-people’s church.  Not the kind of Crazy we UUs traditionally like to be identified as – but rather, deeply disturbed and malignant kind of crazy.  It is known as Satan’s church – seriously! I couldn’t believe it.  Coming from relatively healthy congregations viewed as staples to their communities, this is alarming to me.  A PR nightmare. As the new Worship Chair of this congregation, I hope to help change that public persona, we’ll see how that goes and I will report back on progress.

At this point though it has been easier to fill my house with attendees for retreats, workshops, meditations and concerts than it has been to have people show up for church on Sundays.

Something that is really necessary for all the small and struggling congregations is to consider how they can be collaborating together. Collaboration is key. Yet it means learning to “let go” of some things to gain better things that are best for all concerned.

For example, I think this idea of multi-site congregations is a Key that Maine congregations should be considering.

If the small congregations began to work collaboratively, they could reduce administration costs, share pulpit supply to ensure each Sunday service has the continuity of a professional speaker/minister, and they could host board and congregational retreats together to share ideas on how to build community and meet the pastoral care needs of their congregations.

They could unite in shared visions on how best to live in to our UU Values and Principles.

They could turn their focus towards the spiritual nourishment of their communities which is something that is greatly missing from many congregations as they are focused almost entirely on political advocacy – important, but should never be at the sacrifice of the spiritual needs.

There is more to consider.

I will write more soon.

Sending love,

~ Rev. “Twinkle” Marie Manning